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Developments and Advancements of THAI - AD. 1969 – 1978


1969 - THAI achieved its founding objectives of operating an all-jet service, promoting Thai heritage and tourism to the world and building the most comprehensive routenet of key Asian destinations of any airline.

1970 - When their 10-year contract expired, TAC and SAS signed a cooperation agreement for another 7 years. That year, THAI introduced faster and more economical DC9-41 and DC8-33 aircraft. Royal Orchid Holidays, THAI's innovative travel programme, was created to give travellers individual flexibility yet group cost savings and convenience.

1971 - THAI's first intercontinental route was launched, linking Bangkok to Sydney via Singapore. A new Cargo Terminal was opened at Bangkok International Airport. In its first year, it handled around 2,000 tons of cargo.

1972  - THAI inaugurated its second intercontinental route, this time linking Copenhagen. The first computer-controlled flight simulator for training DC8-33 pilots was housed in the new Flight Crew Training Centre. THAI operated a popular Coffee Shop and deluxe Restaurant at Bangkok International Airport.


1973 - Long haul services to Frankfurt and London were inaugurated developing Bangkok as a major hub and gateway between Europe and Asia. THAI managed the Bangkok International Airport's spacious new Tax Free shop.

1974- Rome was added to the routenet. THAI launched its computerised reservations system. The airline's local and overseas staff now exceeded 3,000 making the airline one of Thailand's largest employers.

1975 - International design company, Walter Landor and Associates developed a stylish new corporate identity for THAI. The Thai dancing figure logo was replaced by a distinctive purple, pink and gold symbol that was embraced worldwide.

1976 - THAI's flights connecting Bangkok to Amsterdam , Paris and Athens, launched the year before, grew quickly in popularity. Passengers flying from Europe stopped over in Bangkok on their way to Australia or to other Asian cities.

1977 - After 17 successful years, the partnership between TAC and SAS ended. SAS shares were sold back to the Thai Airways International was now entirely Thai owned and managed. Backed by a routenet covering 3 continets, experienced staff and full operational support, Thailand's flag carrier was ready to take on the world.

1978 - With the surge in air travel to Thailand and around the world, THAI made the decision to upgrade its fleet with more wide bodied aircraft. The 223-seat Airbus A300-B4s joined the wide -bodied DC-10-30s and improved long haul travel in terms of passenger and cargo capacity as well as passenger comfort.